Come See Me, an “All-Star”, Talk on Ethical Online Marketing in November

I’ve gotten a little stingy about my availability for speaking engagements. Long story short, it’s sort of a pain in the neck.

But, I agreed to teach for the Tennessee Attorneys Memo group, because they have the best marketing materials. Specifically, they lead with the line: “The 12th Annual Tennessee Law Conference boasts an all-star cast of prominent Tennessee judges and attorneys, featuring David Anthony, Gail Ashworth, and James Bryan Moseley.”

So, if you give me top billing and refer to me as an all-star, I’m there.

I’m teaching on November 15, 2018, for the section titled “Ethical Online Marketing.” This is a “dual” credit course, meaning you’ll get ethics and general CLE credit. Plus, I am probably the most prolific blogging, tweeting,  and social media’ing lawyer in town. (Edited: Since publishing this post, this assertion has been questioned by a local attorney.)

The real challenge will be keeping people in their seats and paying attention at 4pm, so I plan to super-charge this talk with lots of examples of terrible and/or unethical online marketing examples.

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I Deactivated Facebook, and I Miss it for Business Reasons (Sort of)

I rolled my eyes, last month, when I saw a few of the New Year’s resolution posts on–and about–social media.

“Goodbye all. I’m deleting [insert name of social media service]. I want to engage more with friends in real life, [etc.]”

But, here I am, a month later, and I’m one of those people. I’ve deleted my Facebook account.

I’ve taught seminars on the pitfalls of social media in family law cases.  (Spoiler alert: If you were born after 1985 and are getting a divorce, it’s already too late for you.)

I’ve taught seminars on the value of social media for lawyer marketing. (Spoiler alert: People don’t want to connect with, hear from, or see pictures of their lawyer on Facebook.)

I won’t go into all the details, but, frankly, I’m sick of all the noise, and, by “noise,” I mean all the ads, and also all the likes, comments, and posts of “friends of friends” (which, in non-Facebook speak, translates to “people who I don’t know”). Simply put, there isn’t a point to any of it.

So, here I am, 24 hours into this grand experiment. And I miss Facebook a little…for business reasons.

I got a call from a potential client, and, using his phone number, I instinctively went to Facebook to search his cell number and look at his Facebook page (i.e. my “Is this a Crazy Person” test).

And, yes, begrudgingly, I’ll admit that Facebook has been occasionally useful for work purposes.

So, here I am, a day into the experiment, and the better play is to delete the App. Or just deactivate Facebook.