341: Nashville lawyers go to US Supreme Court, while Memphis lawyers settle the most talked about Tennessee lawsuit

From the Supreme Court to Nashville... I’m on a plane from Washington, DC, with about 7 Nashville lawyers riding with me, after yesterday’s United States Supreme Court oral arguments that featured Nashville bankruptcy lawyers on both sides.

Here’s how SCOTUS Blog framed the issue: whether a bankruptcy court’s denial of a creditor’s motion seeking relief from the automatic stay is a “final” order that is immediately appealable.

This was a pretty obscure procedural issue, and I pity those poor student groups who sat through the animated back-and-forth about what a “proceeding” is in Bankruptcy Court.

It was a great day for the Nashville bankruptcy bar, and the lawyers on both sides really shined. It was also my first trip to the Big Courthouse, and I’m planning a longer post about the experience for early next week.

Save Bluff City Law! I was forwarded the attached e-mail petition, created by a Memphis lawyer, trying to rally support for NBC’s legal drama Bluff City Law.

I’m impressed by the grass-roots activism from the Memphis bar, and I have to admit, the show makes the practice of law in Memphis look very exciting and scenic. I’m signing the petition.

Bluff City Law, Indeed. Talking about national attention focused on the Memphis bar, it looks like there’s a potential resolution in the James Wiseman v. NCAA and the University of Memphis lawsuit filed in Shelby County Chancery Court.

Here’s my blog post about it from the weekend.

The Daily Memphian interviewed me for their story, What comes next in James Wiseman’s eligibility saga?, about the various legal issues and strategies presented (which, I’ve been told, ESPN’s Jay Bilas quoted in an on air interview!)

No deed goes unpunished, and this involved me diving deep into federal court jurisdictional issues, whether a “nominal defendant” destroys complete diversity, and looking up the exact nuances of Injunctive relief procedure.

Trust me, this was the first time this 26 year old reporter ever cited Wright on Federal Procedure.

Regardless, I love the Daily Memphian, and it got me this close to appearing on the Geoff Calkins radio show as a legal expert. I was scheduled to appear on Monday, but a producer bumped my appearance.

It was with great shame that I notified my Memphis friends and family that I was bumped to make room for listener call-ins.

Speaking of great shame… I was alerted that the following blurb and text auto-posted over the weekend. To be clear, the words below this blurb are a quote from the advice column, not how I feel (at least not all the time).

The opening line? “I’m a litigation attorney and am absolutely miserable.”

341: In 2019, you don’t want to be called any of these: Developer; Bachelor Bro; Lawyer; Podcaster.

“How ‘Developer’ Became Such a Dirty Word.” That’s the title of this New York Times article, talking about the  impact of opportunistic development throughout the boroughs (spoiler alert: it’s not good).

The developers are coming. They’ve got the politicians in their pockets and the gaudy architectural plans in their hands. They will gorge on the entire city. And they won’t stop until peak profit has been wrung from every patch of land.

This is a problem everywhere, and, here in Middle Tennessee, we have front row seats.

In fact, as Nashvillians prepare to head to the polls next month, it’s interesting that the recurring (and most damaging) insult hurled by Mayor David Briley at challenger John Cooper is that Cooper is a  “millionaire developer.Continue reading “341: In 2019, you don’t want to be called any of these: Developer; Bachelor Bro; Lawyer; Podcaster.”

341: Lawyers Doing Good Matters

My law firm recently met with a public relations group, who gave us the pitch on all the things they could do for us, including beefing up our presence on LinkedIn, posting special interest stories on our corporate Facebook page, and more Twitter updates.

After this week of front page stories and national press, I’m not sure we need too much help. Here’s a look at the stories we’ve been involved in this week…

Continue reading “341: Lawyers Doing Good Matters”