Will Landlords’ Casualty Paragraphs be a hot issue for Second Avenue businesses? (It looks like they already are.)

The real estate market has been so hot in Nashville over the past 6-7 years that, any time an old building in an in-demand area burns down, I’ve wondered if the culprit was a crafty real estate developer looking to build a high-rise condo. (Kidding, of course.) But, as matter of law, a disaster can … Continue reading “Will Landlords’ Casualty Paragraphs be a hot issue for Second Avenue businesses? (It looks like they already are.)”

Tennessee is set to increase homestead exemption in 2021

The Tennessee Legislature is, again, considering debtor-friendly changes to the homestead exemption statute. The one most likely to pass is House Bill 1185, which seeks to increase Tennessee’s homestead exemption from the existing $5,000 to $35,000 for single homeowners and from $7,500 to $52,500 for jointly owned property. Before you complain too much about that … Continue reading “Tennessee is set to increase homestead exemption in 2021”

Bankers: Are your Judgments expiring?

Tennessee judgments expire after ten years. All those judgments you took during the Great Recession are coming up for renewal. If you don’t affirmatively ask the court for an extension, they just go away. And, all those builders, contractors, investors, and so many others who were broke in 2010/2011 but who turned things around when … Continue reading “Bankers: Are your Judgments expiring?”

Reformation may save you, but tech experts warn against “cut and pasting” document automation

During her presentation on legal tech at the TBA’s 2020 Creditors Practice Forum, Lori Gonzalez conducted an audience poll on what document-automation technology everybody was using. The creditors’ bar must be an old-school crowd. Overwhelmingly, the most common practice was to: (1) find a similar existing document on your system in Microsoft format; and (2) … Continue reading “Reformation may save you, but tech experts warn against “cut and pasting” document automation”

Legal Tech, but for lawyers who miss the camaraderie of docket calls

Last week, I had to go to the Davidson County Courthouse to file some garnishment pleadings. With the adoption of e-filing and suspension of in-person court proceedings, filing garnishments is really the only reason I set foot in the building. Once upon a time–well, about a year ago–I’d spend nearly every Friday morning there, on … Continue reading “Legal Tech, but for lawyers who miss the camaraderie of docket calls”

341 Stories: Lawyer Compensation Week, the modern business obituaries

Welcome to January 21, 2021, the first full day of the Joe Biden administration. It’s also an interesting time for law firms… Most law firms announce compensation plans this week. The first week of the year is generally spent winding down last year’s financials. The following week is spent distributing bonuses. This third week, though, … Continue reading “341 Stories: Lawyer Compensation Week, the modern business obituaries”

There’s no stay in judgment appeals (unless you ask for one)

There’s a bit of confusion about appellate bonds, particularly when it comes to money judgments from a court of record. “Is what I’ve filed good enough to protect my client from an immediate garnishment?” That’s not a legal question that any attorney wants to learn after a client’s bank account gets hit. In every appeal, … Continue reading “There’s no stay in judgment appeals (unless you ask for one)”

United States Supreme Court: Post-bankruptcy possession doesn’t violate automatic stay

It’s rare the the United States Supreme Court decides a legal issue that affects everyday consumer bankruptcies, but today was one of those days. In City of Chicago, Illinois v. Fulton, the Supreme Court ruled unanimously that a creditor who repossesses property prior to a bankruptcy filing is not required to release that property after … Continue reading “United States Supreme Court: Post-bankruptcy possession doesn’t violate automatic stay”

Law Students: Law School Grades Will Not Define Your Career

Over the long New Years holiday, I found my law school’s “Lawyers of the Future” picture book in a box while cleaning out my basement. This was a booklet all University of Tennessee College of Law students were given at the start of a school year, with pictures and biographies of all the law students. … Continue reading “Law Students: Law School Grades Will Not Define Your Career”

Unreliable 2021 Predictions for the Nashville Legal World

2020 wasn’t a great year for predictions for me. Remember when I boldly predicted that June 2021 would see an all-time spike for consumer bankruptcy filings in Nashville? (Note: That time period actually saw local bankruptcies hit a 10 year low.) Remember when I joined an out-of-town law firm with the express goal of creating … Continue reading “Unreliable 2021 Predictions for the Nashville Legal World”