Creditor Essentials: The Difference between a Bankruptcy Discharge and a Bankruptcy Dismissal

Just as all rivers run to the sea, all bankruptcy cases run to a bankruptcy discharge. Unless they don’t…which probably means that the case has been dismissed.

If you are a creditor, there is a big difference between a bankruptcy discharge and a bankruptcy dismissal.

A discharge means there is no (or modified) liability for the borrower’s debts, usually under 11 U.S.C. 727, 1141, or 1328.  Simply put, a “discharge” means that the debtor wins and doesn’t owe the debt any more.

A dismissal generally means that something has gone wrong in the case (such as a payment default under a Chapter 13 Plan or some failure by the Debtor to comply with the Bankruptcy Code) and, as a result, the bankruptcy case is going to prematurely end…without a discharge.  Here, the creditor wins because the debtor doesn’t get a discharge, and the debt remains due and owing.

This may be an obvious distinction, but it wasn’t to me on the first day I practiced bankruptcy law. Considering the absolutely polar-opposite results the two outcomes have for creditors, however, I learned this important lesson quickly.

2 thoughts on “Creditor Essentials: The Difference between a Bankruptcy Discharge and a Bankruptcy Dismissal

  1. Pingback: Effective Post-Bankruptcy Dismissal Collections Start Immediately « Creditors Rights 101

  2. Pingback: A Bankruptcy Filing Doesn’t End the Collections Process « Creditors Rights 101

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